FREE CLICK & COLLECT SERVICE NOW AVAILABLE | SPEND €10 FOR FREE HOME DELIVERY

Toward the visualization of history

by Mark Moss | 21 December 2009
Synopsis
Over the past 50 years, the influence of visuals has impacted society with greater frequency. No subject is immune from the power of visual culture, and this fact becomes especially pronounced with regards to history and historical discourse. Where once the study of the past was books and printed articles, the environment has changed and students now enter the lecture hall with a sense of history that has been gleaned from television, film, photography, and other new media. They come to understand history based on what they have seen and heard, not what they have read. What are the implications of this process, this visualization of history? Mark Moss discusses the impact of visuals on the study of history with an examination of visual culture and the future of print. Recognizing the visual bias of the younger generations and using this as a starting point for teaching history is a critical component for reaching students. By providing an analysis of photography, film, television, and computer culture, Moss uses the Holocaust as an historical case study to illustrate the ways in which visual culture can be used to bring about an awareness of history, as well as the potential for visual culture becoming a driving force for social and cultural change.
€41.93
125 Reward Points
In stock online
Delivery in 5-7 Days
Eligible for free delivery

Any purchases for more than €10 are eligible for free delivery anywhere in the UK or Ireland!

Synopsis
Over the past 50 years, the influence of visuals has impacted society with greater frequency. No subject is immune from the power of visual culture, and this fact becomes especially pronounced with regards to history and historical discourse. Where once the study of the past was books and printed articles, the environment has changed and students now enter the lecture hall with a sense of history that has been gleaned from television, film, photography, and other new media. They come to understand history based on what they have seen and heard, not what they have read. What are the implications of this process, this visualization of history? Mark Moss discusses the impact of visuals on the study of history with an examination of visual culture and the future of print. Recognizing the visual bias of the younger generations and using this as a starting point for teaching history is a critical component for reaching students. By providing an analysis of photography, film, television, and computer culture, Moss uses the Holocaust as an historical case study to illustrate the ways in which visual culture can be used to bring about an awareness of history, as well as the potential for visual culture becoming a driving force for social and cultural change.
Quantity
Quantity
€41.93
125 Reward Points
In stock online
Delivery in 5-7 Days
Eligible for free delivery

Any purchases for more than €10 are eligible for free delivery anywhere in the UK or Ireland!

Quantity
Quantity

Product Details

ISBN - 9780739124383
Format -
Publisher -
Published - 21/12/2009
Categories - All, Books, History and Politics, History Books, General History, All, Books, Education, Media Studies Academic
No. of Pages - 254
Weight - 1.1
Edition -
Series - - Not Available
Page Size - 23
Language - en-US
Readership Age - Not Available
Table of Contents - Not Available

Delivery And Returns

Please Note: Items in our extended range may take longer to deliver. For this reason, we cannot guarantee delivery of this item before Christmas.

Place an order for over €10 to receive free delivery to anywhere in Ireland and the UK! See our Delivery Charges section below for a full breakdown of shipping costs for all destinations.

 

Delivery Charges

  Ireland & UK* Europe & USA Australia & Canada Rest of World
Under €10 €3.80 €10 €15 €25
Over €10
Free €10 €15 €25

*Free delivery on all orders over €10 - only applies to order total.

All orders will be delivered by An Post.