The 1940s home

by Paul Evans | 10 August 2009
PAPERBACK
Category: DIY
The history of the British home in the 1940s is dominated by the impacts Second World War. In the first five years of the decade, homes were adapted to better survive the affects of bombing. The 1930s home became the wartime home with the addition of anti-blast tape on the windows, sandbags around the door, and a Morrison shelter in the kitchen. In the garden, the lawn and shrubs gave way to vegetable plot and chicken coop. For those lucky enough to have a home left unscathed by the war the second half of the decade was likely a time of consolidation snd continued rationing. The policy of "make do and mend" continued. But for those whose houses were damaged or destroyed, or those moved out of their homes by post-war rehousing schemes, the picture was very different. For many the pre-fab became home, and new designs of furniture made under the utility scheme furnished rooms cheaply and stylishly. New estates, different from anything tried before the war, arose from the bombsites, offering state of the art sanitisation and modern facilities to thousands.
€8.39
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The history of the British home in the 1940s is dominated by the impacts Second World War. In the first five years of the decade, homes were adapted to better survive the affects of bombing. The 1930s home became the wartime home with the addition of anti-blast tape on the windows, sandbags around the door, and a Morrison shelter in the kitchen. In the garden, the lawn and shrubs gave way to vegetable plot and chicken coop. For those lucky enough to have a home left unscathed by the war the second half of the decade was likely a time of consolidation snd continued rationing. The policy of "make do and mend" continued. But for those whose houses were damaged or destroyed, or those moved out of their homes by post-war rehousing schemes, the picture was very different. For many the pre-fab became home, and new designs of furniture made under the utility scheme furnished rooms cheaply and stylishly. New estates, different from anything tried before the war, arose from the bombsites, offering state of the art sanitisation and modern facilities to thousands.
Currently out of stock
Orders will not be processed until after the current Coronavirus (COVID-19) restrictions are lifted
25 Reward Points

Any purchases for more than €10 are eligible for free delivery anywhere in the UK or Ireland!

€8.39
Currently out of stock
Orders will not be processed until after the current Coronavirus (COVID-19) restrictions are lifted
25 Reward Points

Any purchases for more than €10 are eligible for free delivery anywhere in the UK or Ireland!

Product Description

The history of the British home in the 1940s is dominated by the impacts Second World War. In the first five years of the decade, homes were adapted to better survive the affects of bombing. The 1930s home became the wartime home with the addition of anti-blast tape on the windows, sandbags around the door, and a Morrison shelter in the kitchen. In the garden, the lawn and shrubs gave way to vegetable plot and chicken coop. For those lucky enough to have a home left unscathed by the war the second half of the decade was likely a time of consolidation snd continued rationing. The policy of "make do and mend" continued. But for those whose houses were damaged or destroyed, or those moved out of their homes by post-war rehousing schemes, the picture was very different. For many the pre-fab became home, and new designs of furniture made under the utility scheme furnished rooms cheaply and stylishly. New estates, different from anything tried before the war, arose from the bombsites, offering state of the art sanitisation and modern facilities to thousands.

Product Details

The 1940s home

ISBN9780747807360

FormatPAPERBACK

Publisher (10 August. 2009)

No. of Pages48

Weight126

Language English (United States)

Dimensions 210 x 149 x 7