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Say Little, Do Much

by Sioban Nelson | 01 September 2003
PAPERBACK
Category: Medical Academic
Synopsis
In the nineteenth century, more than a third of American hospitals were established and run by women with religious vocations. In Say Little, Do Much , Sioban Nelson casts light on the work of these women's religious communities. According to Nelson, the popular view that nursing invented itself in the second half of the nineteenth century is historically inaccurate and dismissive of the major advances in the care of the sick as a serious and skilled activity, an activity that originated in seventeenth-century France with Vincent de Paul's Daughters of Charity. In this comparative, contextual, and critical work, Nelson demonstrates how modern nursing developed from the complex interplay of the Catholic emancipation in Britain and Ireland, the resurgence of the Irish Church, the Irish diaspora, and the mass migrations of the German, Italian, and Polish Catholic communities to the previously Protestant strongholds of North America and mainland Britain. In particular, Nelson follows the nursing Daughters of Charity through the French Revolution and the Second Empire, documenting the relationship that developed between the French nursing orders and the Irish Catholic Church during this period. This relationship, she argues, was to have major significance for the development of nursing in the English-speaking world.
€29.39
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Currently out of stock
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Any purchases for more than €10 are eligible for free delivery anywhere in the UK or Ireland!

Synopsis
In the nineteenth century, more than a third of American hospitals were established and run by women with religious vocations. In Say Little, Do Much , Sioban Nelson casts light on the work of these women's religious communities. According to Nelson, the popular view that nursing invented itself in the second half of the nineteenth century is historically inaccurate and dismissive of the major advances in the care of the sick as a serious and skilled activity, an activity that originated in seventeenth-century France with Vincent de Paul's Daughters of Charity. In this comparative, contextual, and critical work, Nelson demonstrates how modern nursing developed from the complex interplay of the Catholic emancipation in Britain and Ireland, the resurgence of the Irish Church, the Irish diaspora, and the mass migrations of the German, Italian, and Polish Catholic communities to the previously Protestant strongholds of North America and mainland Britain. In particular, Nelson follows the nursing Daughters of Charity through the French Revolution and the Second Empire, documenting the relationship that developed between the French nursing orders and the Irish Catholic Church during this period. This relationship, she argues, was to have major significance for the development of nursing in the English-speaking world.
€29.39
88 Reward Points
Currently out of stock
Delivery in 5-7 Days
Eligible for free delivery

Any purchases for more than €10 are eligible for free delivery anywhere in the UK or Ireland!


Product Details

ISBN - 9780812217834
Format - PAPERBACK
Publisher -
Published - 01/09/2003
Categories - All, Books, Education, Medical Academic
No. of Pages - 240
Weight - 376
Edition -
Series - - Not Available
Page Size - 23
Language - en-US
Readership Age - Not Available
Table of Contents - Not Available

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