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"Race," Rights and the Law in the Supreme Court of Canada

by James W. St.G. Walker | 27 October 1997
PAPERBACK
Synopsis
Four cases in which the legal issue was "race" -- that of a Chinese restaurant owner who was fined for employing a white woman; a black man who was refused service in a bar; a Jew who wanted to buy a cottage but was prevented by the property owners' association; and a Trinidadian of East Indian descent who was acceptable to the Canadian army but was rejected for immigration on grounds of "race" -- drawn from the period between 1914 and 1955, are intimately examined to explore the role of the Supreme Court of Canada and the law in the racialization of Canadian society. With painstaking research into contemporary attitudes and practices, Walker demonstrates that Supreme Court Justices were expressing the prevailing "common sense" about "race" in their legal decisions. He shows that injustice on the grounds of "race" has been chronic in Canadian history, and that the law itself was once instrumental in creating these circumstances. The book concludes with a controversial discussion of current directions in Canadian law and their potential impact on Canada's future as a multicultural society.
€53.19
159 Reward Points
Currently out of stock
Delivery 5-7 Days
Eligible for free delivery

Any purchases for more than €10 are eligible for free delivery anywhere in the UK or Ireland!

Synopsis
Four cases in which the legal issue was "race" -- that of a Chinese restaurant owner who was fined for employing a white woman; a black man who was refused service in a bar; a Jew who wanted to buy a cottage but was prevented by the property owners' association; and a Trinidadian of East Indian descent who was acceptable to the Canadian army but was rejected for immigration on grounds of "race" -- drawn from the period between 1914 and 1955, are intimately examined to explore the role of the Supreme Court of Canada and the law in the racialization of Canadian society. With painstaking research into contemporary attitudes and practices, Walker demonstrates that Supreme Court Justices were expressing the prevailing "common sense" about "race" in their legal decisions. He shows that injustice on the grounds of "race" has been chronic in Canadian history, and that the law itself was once instrumental in creating these circumstances. The book concludes with a controversial discussion of current directions in Canadian law and their potential impact on Canada's future as a multicultural society.
€53.19
159 Reward Points
Currently out of stock
Delivery 5-7 Days
Eligible for free delivery

Any purchases for more than €10 are eligible for free delivery anywhere in the UK or Ireland!


Product Details

ISBN - 9780889203068
Format - PAPERBACK
Publisher -
Published - 27/10/1997
Categories - All, Books, History and Politics, History Books, History of the Americas
No. of Pages - 464
Weight - 635
Edition -
Series - - Not Available
Page Size - 221
Language - en-US
Readership Age - Not Available
Table of Contents - Not Available

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