Kant's inferentialism

by David Landy | 10 April 2015
Category: Philosophy
Synopsis
Kant's Inferentialism draws on a wide range of sources to present a reading of Kant's theory of mental representation as a direct response to the challenges issued by Hume in A Treatise of Human Nature . Kant rejects the conclusions that Hume draws on the grounds that these are predicated on Hume's theory of mental representation, which Kant refutes by presenting objections to Hume's treatment of representations of complex states of affairs and the nature of judgment. In its place, Kant combines an account of concepts as rules of inference with a detailed account of perception and of the self as the locus of conceptual norms to form a complete theory of human experience as an essentially rule-governed enterprise aimed at producing a representation of the world as a system of objects necessarily connected to one another via causal laws. This interpretation of the historical dialectic enriches our understanding of both Hume and Kant and brings to bear Kant's insights into mental representation on contemporary debates in philosophy of mind. Kant's version of inferentialism is both resistant to objections to contemporary accounts that cast these as forms of linguistic idealism, and serves as a remedy to misplaced Humean scientism about representation.
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Synopsis
Kant's Inferentialism draws on a wide range of sources to present a reading of Kant's theory of mental representation as a direct response to the challenges issued by Hume in A Treatise of Human Nature . Kant rejects the conclusions that Hume draws on the grounds that these are predicated on Hume's theory of mental representation, which Kant refutes by presenting objections to Hume's treatment of representations of complex states of affairs and the nature of judgment. In its place, Kant combines an account of concepts as rules of inference with a detailed account of perception and of the self as the locus of conceptual norms to form a complete theory of human experience as an essentially rule-governed enterprise aimed at producing a representation of the world as a system of objects necessarily connected to one another via causal laws. This interpretation of the historical dialectic enriches our understanding of both Hume and Kant and brings to bear Kant's insights into mental representation on contemporary debates in philosophy of mind. Kant's version of inferentialism is both resistant to objections to contemporary accounts that cast these as forms of linguistic idealism, and serves as a remedy to misplaced Humean scientism about representation.
€154.00
462 Reward Points
Currently out of stock
Delivery 2-7 working days.
Eligible for free delivery

Any purchases for more than €10 are eligible for free delivery anywhere in the UK or Ireland!


Product Details

ISBN - 9781138913080
Format -
Publisher -
Published - 10/04/2015
Categories - All, Books, History and Politics, Politics Philosophy, Philosophy
No. of Pages - 320
Weight - 592
Edition - First edition
Series - - Not Available
Page Size - 24
Language - en-US
Readership Age - Not Available
Table of Contents - Not Available

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